Dust flux, Vostok ice core

Dust flux, Vostok ice core
Two dimensional phase space reconstruction of dust flux from the Vostok core over the period 186-4 ka using the time derivative method. Dust flux on the x-axis, rate of change is on the y-axis. From Gipp (2001).

Thursday, December 4, 2014

Another thing to try before you die

Accupuncture . . . with big blunt copper needles.

It only takes a few tries for them to penetrate. Then he twists them around. It's so good.

And the needles really are copper. Apparently, this is important.

Had that today. I went in because of my back. Now everything hurts so much I don't notice my back any more. Eventually everything that is cramped up should relax and stop hurting, according to theory.

Anyway, I can't hold my hands up to type anymore.

5 comments:

  1. Since you're in China, can I ask you a question?

    Do Chinese citizens have to pay a capital gains tax on stock market profits? If so, when is tax bill time?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I haven't asked anybody that yet, mainly because I'm a little leery of buying Chinese stocks. In any case at the moment I am still sending most of my money back home. But I'll try to find out and reply here, or if interesting enough, post.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I am assured that capital gains are tax-free. However, this may last only so long as the government doesn't get its act together. I have been advised that it would be unwise to assume they will always be tax-free

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, if Xi is trying to goose the stock market like Bill Bishop says he is, and if Xi is a proper communist, then yeah - he must be looking at those capital gains thinking "wow, we can tax the bourgeois capitalists on their gambling winnings and it'll be a new source of government income!".

      Funny that he's not taxing them now. I wonder how many other developed-nation sources of income the Chinese state is forgoing at present. Maybe development of a DM taxation system is yet another ace in the hole for Xi.

      Delete
  4. There doesn't seem to be a lot of tax here. My employer tells me that he remits taxes on my behalf, but the amount is only a small fraction of what I am paid (although he didn't admit what fraction that was).

    In Ghana, the Americans have been advising the local government on how to best increase tax revenue. As employers in Ghana, we were hit with a raft of additional paperwork and demands for tax remittances. Luckily, the current enmity between the US and China suggests they won't be providing such advice here.

    ReplyDelete